nao-robot-1

Different Types Of J2ee Application Servers

Introduction of J2EE application server

An applications server helps in creating and implementing applications by successfully executing programs, scripts, and routines. Where java platform is concerned, application server often refers to J2EE application server and there are a host of different J2EE application servers.

Benefits and limitations of J2EE application server

Benefits: Since all the information and data is stored in one centralized location, therefore updating and upgrading the applications become that much more easy. A central point for storing data also ensures a high level of security where only service provides can have access to the data.
The performance of large applications improves drastically since the network traffic is limited to performance tier traffic.

Limitations: Since all the information is stored at one centralized location that is the servers, therefore if there is a technical glitch in the servers, application cannot be accessed. Many times, there is dependability of network connections and this can cause problem if there is a network outage.

List of various J2EE application servers There are a number of different kinds of J2EE application Servers. Some of the most popular and common ones that J2EE developers use while building applications include the following:

Apache Geronimo: Apache Software Foundation built this open source application server and its foundation is based on a microkernel called Java EE agnostic.

Glassfish Application Server: Sun Microsystems have developed Glassfish for the Java EE platform and is based on Sun and Oracle Corporations TopLink persistence system source code.

JBoss: JBoss is an open source Java EE based application server and since it is Java based therefore it can run cross-platform. It can run on any operating system that supports Java.

Websphere: This application server is an IBM product and is constructed from open standards such as XML, Java EE and web services.

Oracle OC4J: Developed by Oracle, this server’s core components include Oracle HTTP server and OC4J, OracleAS containers that deploy Java EE based applications.

J2EE Server Comparison WebSphere and OC4J are two of the most common java servers used for a applications and there does exist a couple of differences between both of them. Installing WebSphere is quite complicated and for different platforms a different configuration would be required. This is not the case with OC4J, which requires only a couple of minutes to get installed. WebSphere needs J2EE developers to use only proprietary packages and therefore it does not support the Servlet 2.3 API requirements. OC4J is completely compliant with Servlet 2.3 API. To install and run applications, WebSphere needs a database repository while OC4J can perform server configuration and J2EE applications development through easy to understand and configure .xml files

Related Posts